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Evaluation

"The SPF Process" by Center on the Family. All rights reserved.

Evaluation

While evaluation is situated as the last step in the SPF process, in reality it is an integral part of the entire SPF structure. Evaluation is a powerful strategy for investigating how programs and interventions are doing in terms of whether they are making the impacts they intend, as well as a useful tool for suggesting how programs can continue to grow and improve in the future. These two questions are at the heart of what a community really needs to know about its prevention programs:

  • Are they working?
  • Can they work better?

Sometimes evaluation can seem threatening or intimidating, like having to pass an exam or test. However, it is more useful to think about evaluation as a wonderful tool to help organizations and communities better reach their goals. In order to know if our programs are doing what we want them to do we need to collect information, track changes, and consider outcomes. However, rather than being seen as issuing a pass or fail verdict for programs, if done well, the evaluation process can be used at every step of a prevention plan to see if the plan is on target and to suggest new ideas and avenues for continuous improvement and progress.

SPF in Hawai'i: Evaluation

The SPF-SIG project included a comprehensive evaluation of every step of the SPF process at the state, county, and program levels. For each prevention education program implemented under the project, service providers and service organizations were trained in the skills needed to carry out an evaluation of their programs. Outcome indicator data was collected from program participants before, immediately after, and 3-6 months following program implementation. In this way community team members could examine whether these programs were associated with the desired changes at the individual level.

The evaluation team also compiled outcome indicator data at the county and state level to monitor whether or not the project as whole was having the desired impact at the population/community level. However, these larger-scale changes take time and involve many complicated factors (such as community norms and ever-changing social influences), so it is important to interpret these population-level outcome indicators cautiously.

Final outcome findings from the comprehensive evaluation were shared with project stakeholders in all four counties as well as disseminated to the community at large through the publication of the SPF-SIG Final Report (2015).

Tools

 

References

Goodman, R. (1998). Principles and tools for evaluating community-based prevention and health promotion programs. Journal of Public Health Management Practice, 4(2), 37-47.
Kay, E.J. (1994). Health Promotion: the problems of measurement and evaluation. Journal of institutional health education, 32(1), 13-15.
Nutbean, Don. 1998. “Evaluating health promotion – progress, problems, and solutions.” Health promotion international 13(1):27-44.
SAMHSA. (2015, September 25). Step 5: Evaluation. Retrieved from http://www.samhsa.gov/capt/applying-strategic-prevention-framework/step5-evaluation
Springett, Jane. 2001. “Appropriate approaches to the evaluation of health promotion.” Critical public health 11(2): 139-151.

April 2020

Apr 02 Thu
ADAD Training: Relapse Prevention
The purpose of this course is to provide relapse prevention tools for substance abuse counselors and mental health providers. Participants will identify potential risk factors, gain a basic understanding of developing relapse prevention plans, and evaluate effectiveness of relapse prevention strategies.
Location

Kakuhihewa State Building ADAD Building, Room 111 A/B 601 Kamokila Blvd Kapolei, HI 96707

Apr 03 Fri
ADAD Training: Self-Care Practices for Mental Health Professional
The importance of self-care for professionals entails continuously "looking after your own mental health and wellbeing so that you can more effectively support the young people you work with". Participants will be able to discuss the importance of self-care and impact - both positive and negative. Participants will also learn new skills to decrease burnout and stress-related illness, become more effective in the workplace. Also, apply these skills to everyday practice.
Location

Kakuhihewa State Building ADAD Building - Room 111 A/B Kapolei, HI 96707

Apr 09 Thu
ADAD Training: Group Therapy

Participants will be able to: 1. Have a strong understating of the different types of groups available for treatment and post-treatment settings. 2. Confidently understand the levels of care and be familiar with the assessment criteria.  3 Identify group dynamics and facilitate group discussions in a creative way that helps all members feel included and validated.

Location

Hawaii State Laboratory 2725 Waimano Home Rd. Pearl City, HI 96782

Apr 13 Mon
ADAD Training: HIV, Hepatitis, & STIs 101

Upon attending this training, participants will be able to:
1. Describe the transmission routes and prevention methods for viral hepatitis, HIV, and STDs.
2. List components of an effective risk assessment for sexually transmitted and other communicable disease.
3 Demonstrate risk reduction counseling techniques for people living with and at-risk for viral hepatitis, HIV, and STDs. 

Location

Kakuhihewa State BuildingADAD Building, Room 111 A/B 601 Kamokila Blvd. Kapolei, HI 96707