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Evidence-Based Interventions

"Road Trip to Pu'uloa" by Makuahine Pa'i Ki'i

Evidence-Based Interventions

Evidence-Based Programs, Policies, and Practices (EBPs) are found to be effective based on the results of rigorous evaluations. Ultimately, when choosing an intervention, we want to know first and foremost if it will work. In other words, is the program or policy likely to do what we hope it will do? Choosing a program or policy that has been scientifically evaluated to determine its effectiveness is one way to increase the likelihood of good results. The following definitions can help you navigate through the different kinds of prevention interventions that are out there:

Evidence Based, Promising, Best and Emerging Practices Defined

  1. Evidence-Based Practices are strategies, activities, or approaches which have been shown through scientific research and evaluation to be effective at preventing and/or delaying an unwanted outcome. 
  2. Best Practices are programs, strategies, or approaches that have resulted from a rigorous process of peer review and evaluation that indicates effectiveness in improving prevention outcomes for a target population.
  3. Promising Practices are programs, strategies, or approaches that have some scientific research or data showing their effectiveness in delaying an unwanted outcome, but do not have enough evidence to support generalizable conclusions.
  4. Emerging Practices are programs, strategies or approaches which incorporate the philosophy, values, characteristics, and indicators of other positive/effective prevention interventions. They are based on guidelines, protocols, standards, or preferred practice patterns that have been proven to lead to effective public health outcomes. They also incorporate a process of continual quality improvement.

Using an EBP increases the chance that the program will work as intended. However, there is no one-size-fits-all program. The best fit intervention is one that is relevant to the community logic model and appropriate to the community’s needs, resources, and readiness to act.

Most, if not all, EBPs are developed based on research and theory about what program components are likely to work for the targeted population. To ensure successful outcomes, it is often important to implement the program with fidelity, making sure to include all the core components of the program during implementation. If you need to adapt the program to fit local conditions or meet specific needs, these changes should be made carefully and systematically, based on a thorough understanding of the program theory and core components.

To help guide your work, you can explore some resources to access information on evidence-based prevention programs and practices. One such resource is Blueprints for Healthy Youth Development where you can find interventions based on specific criteria, like focusing on problem behaviors surrounding alcohol and illicit drug use. Another great resource is The Guide to Community Preventive Services, which provides recommendations and findings from the Community Preventive Services Task Force (Task Force) regarding programs and policies on public health topics, including excessive alcohol consumption.

The education strategies and environmental strategies accessed through this section are a part of the growing number of EBPs that have been implemented in Hawai‘i in the past few years. Each program or strategy is presented with an overview of programmatic or policy information and local implementation history based on publicly available online and printed sources, such as the the websites listed above, peer-review journals, and reports. The list is not exhaustive of all EBPs implemented in Hawai‘i and does not constitute an endorsement or approval.

Tools

References

Kentucky Cabinet for Health and Family Services (n.d). Emerging, promising and best practices definitions. Retrieved from: http://chfs.ky.gov/NR/rdonlyres/49670601-F568-4962-974F-8B76A1D771D3/0/Emerging_Promising_Best_Practices.pdf

O’Garro, M.A. and McDonald, S. (January, 2009). “Evidence-based” and “promising practices” and other important terms defined. Thurston County Public Health & Social Services - Epidemiology, Assessment & Planning Section. Retrieved from: http://www.co.thurston.wa.us/treatment-tax/docs/EvidenceBasedSummary.pdf

SAMSHA (July, 2019). Finding Evidence-based Programs and Practices. Retrieved from: 20190719-samhsa-finding_evidence-based-programs-practices.pdf

SAMSHA-CSAP (January, 2009). Identifying and Selecting Evidence-Based Interventions. Revised Guidance Document for the SPF-SIG Program. Retrieved from: https://store.samhsa.gov/shin/content/SMA09-4205/SMA09-4205.pdf

 

 

September 2021

Sep 08 Wed
Enhancing Your Prevention Communication Strategies Through Traditional Media and Social Media

Learning Objectives:

  • Define social marketing, social norms marketing, and media advocacy
  • Identify how the goals and focus audiences differ for social marketing, social norms marketing, and media advocacy
  • List the steps necessary to implement social marketing, social norms marketing, and media advocacy
  • Identify when social media can be used to augment their substance misuse prevention work
  • Select the appropriate social media platform(s) for their focus audience(s)
  • Apply best practices for creating social media posts
  • Identify appropriate use of social media when implementing social marketing campaigns, social norms marketing campaigns, and media advocacy strategies
Location

Zoom

Sep 14 Tue
Ethics in Prevention for Maui County Providers

This free, two-day virtual training will cover the topic of ethics in the substance misuse prevention field.  The training will cover key terminology, the six principles in the Prevention Code of Ethics, and a decision-making process to use when faced with an ethical dilemma.  

Location

Zoom

Sep 14 Tue
Community Engagement Webinars (Two-Session)

Learning Objectives:

  • Explore a framework for community participation in prevention
  • Identify who you want to engage in which prevention efforts
  • Brainstorm ways to engage them during COVID-19 restrictions
  • Develop your community engagement plan
Location

Zoom

Sep 17 Fri
Sustainability 101: Sustaining Your Work for the Long-Haul!

Organizations are continuously faced with the day-to-day challenges of running programs and its operations. This often makes it difficult for organizations to make time to develop sustainability plans that take a broader perspective on ways to continue the work into the future. This training will explore ways for programs, coalitions, and organizations to understand sustainability, and begin developing a plan that sustains the work and the organization. We'll discuss key elements of sustainability, and participants will have an opportunity to collaborate with other professionals, and take initial steps to begin developing a sustainability plan for their program, organization, or coalition.

Location

Zoom

Sep 17 Fri
Maui County's September Network Meeting

This is a casual event to provide an opportunity for prevention providers and stakeholders to network and collaborate, discuss training and news updates, and share prevention-related information with each other.

There will be sharing and discussion on updates from organizations and prevention programs, and discussion of any relevant news, opportunities for collaboration, or other relevant prevention-related information.

Other resources and trainings needed will be discussed.

Location

Zoom

Sep 17 Fri
Partnerships for Success: Evidence-Based Workgroup Meeting

2021 Evidence-Based Workgroup Meeting

Location

Zoom

Sep 24 Fri
Evaluation 101: The Whys, Whats, and Hows to Evaluating Your Program

This training will explore the basic concepts of evaluation and will teach attendees how to utilize Excel to assist in program evaluation.

Location

Zoom

Sep 29 Wed
Prevention Ethics

The participants will learn the role and application of ethics in substance abuse prevention. Using scenarios and interactive activities, participants will explore the six standards in the Prevention Code of Ethics.

 

 

Location

Zoom