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Implementation

"The SPF Process" by Center on the Family. All rights reserved.

Implementation

After a community has carefully chosen and planned their prevention strategy, it is then time to implement the prevention program or programs. Implementation is the next step in the SPF process. At this stage it is important to think about the prevention program’s ‘active ingredients,’ or its goals, objectives, timeline, and protocols. It is likely that a program will need to be adapted to fit local conditions so as to be a good match for the cultural norms, values, and beliefs of a community. If an intervention is not seen as relevant to the target population, it is not likely to be effective. However, communities and organizations should be thoughtful and purposeful about the changes they make to their prevention programs. When making cultural adaptations to a program, changes need to be recorded and should not alter the features of the program that are thought to be the key ingredients for change.

When implementing culturally appropriate programs, service providers and planners often have to strike a balance between fidelity to the original program design and cultural adaption.

  • Adaptation: Any change a prevention program undergoes in order to meet specific needs. Two types of adaptation include changes to program:
  • Content: Making changes or additions to program manuals, tasks, and tools so that the content is more relevant to the target population. In order to be effective these changes should reflect the use of both culturally relevant names, terms, and examples (surface structure) and culturally relevant concepts, themes, and issues (deep structure).
  • Delivery: Making changes to the way programs are carried out (e.g., online vs. in the classroom)
  • Fidelity: The degree that an implemented prevention program stays ‘true’ to what its designers intended. Fidelity can be described along 4 dimensions:
  • Adherence: How much did your program stick to the original design? It is not always possible or even desirable (in the case of cultural adaptations) to administer a program exactly as designed. However, it is important to note any deviations from the design to see if these have impacted your outcomes in some way.
  • Dose: How much of the program did your target population receive? This refers to the number of classes or meetings participants actually attended, as well as the length and intensity of the program activities. It is important to keep track of the dose because it is quite possible that participants who attended more activities will show more change than those who left the program early.
  • Quality of delivery: In the end, how high was the quality of your program delivery? This refers to the level of staffing and training as well as the resources deployed during program activities. It is possible to follow a program manual precisely but without a focus on the quality of the delivery. This is often the result of poor planning, inadequate training, or lack of enthusiasm on the part of program staff.
  • Participant responsiveness: How did your target population respond to the program? A successful prevention program is not only well implemented with a high-level of quality, but it is also relevant to your participants. If your program is not meaningful and useful to your target audience, than even high-quality implementation will result in disappointing outcomes. Therefore, measuring the level of participant engagement is critical to understanding whether a program is effective.

Tools

 

References

Castro, F., Barrera, M., and Martinez, C. (2004). The cultural adaptation of prevention interventions: resolving tension between fidelity and fit. Prevention Science, 5(1), 41-45.
Dusenbury, L., Brannigan, R., Falco, M., and Hansen, W. (2003). A review of research on fidelity of implementation: implications for drug abuse prevention in school settings. Health Education Research Theory & Practice, 18(2), 237-256. 
Moncher, F., and Prinz, R. (1991). Treatment fidelity in outcome studies. Clinical Psychology Review, 11, 247-266.
SAMHSA. (2015, October 1). Step 4: Implement. Retrieved from http://www.samhsa.gov/capt/applying-strategic-prevention-framework/step4-implement

September 2021

Sep 08 Wed
Enhancing Your Prevention Communication Strategies Through Traditional Media and Social Media

Learning Objectives:

  • Define social marketing, social norms marketing, and media advocacy
  • Identify how the goals and focus audiences differ for social marketing, social norms marketing, and media advocacy
  • List the steps necessary to implement social marketing, social norms marketing, and media advocacy
  • Identify when social media can be used to augment their substance misuse prevention work
  • Select the appropriate social media platform(s) for their focus audience(s)
  • Apply best practices for creating social media posts
  • Identify appropriate use of social media when implementing social marketing campaigns, social norms marketing campaigns, and media advocacy strategies
Location

Zoom

Sep 14 Tue
Ethics in Prevention for Maui County Providers

This free, two-day virtual training will cover the topic of ethics in the substance misuse prevention field.  The training will cover key terminology, the six principles in the Prevention Code of Ethics, and a decision-making process to use when faced with an ethical dilemma.  

Location

Zoom

Sep 14 Tue
Community Engagement Webinars (Two-Session)

Learning Objectives:

  • Explore a framework for community participation in prevention
  • Identify who you want to engage in which prevention efforts
  • Brainstorm ways to engage them during COVID-19 restrictions
  • Develop your community engagement plan
Location

Zoom

Sep 17 Fri
Sustainability 101: Sustaining Your Work for the Long-Haul!

Organizations are continuously faced with the day-to-day challenges of running programs and its operations. This often makes it difficult for organizations to make time to develop sustainability plans that take a broader perspective on ways to continue the work into the future. This training will explore ways for programs, coalitions, and organizations to understand sustainability, and begin developing a plan that sustains the work and the organization. We'll discuss key elements of sustainability, and participants will have an opportunity to collaborate with other professionals, and take initial steps to begin developing a sustainability plan for their program, organization, or coalition.

Location

Zoom

Sep 17 Fri
Maui County's September Network Meeting

This is a casual event to provide an opportunity for prevention providers and stakeholders to network and collaborate, discuss training and news updates, and share prevention-related information with each other.

There will be sharing and discussion on updates from organizations and prevention programs, and discussion of any relevant news, opportunities for collaboration, or other relevant prevention-related information.

Other resources and trainings needed will be discussed.

Location

Zoom

Sep 17 Fri
Partnerships for Success: Evidence-Based Workgroup Meeting

2021 Evidence-Based Workgroup Meeting

Location

Zoom

Sep 24 Fri
Evaluation 101: The Whys, Whats, and Hows to Evaluating Your Program

This training will explore the basic concepts of evaluation and will teach attendees how to utilize Excel to assist in program evaluation.

Location

Zoom

Sep 29 Wed
Prevention Ethics

The participants will learn the role and application of ethics in substance abuse prevention. Using scenarios and interactive activities, participants will explore the six standards in the Prevention Code of Ethics.

 

 

Location

Zoom